8 useful tips for avoiding sticky situations abroad

Traveling abroad can be a stressful experience if you’re not sure what to watch out for. Here are a few tips for staying away from extra charges, potentially tense moments and other annoying problems while traveling.

 

8 tips on how to avoid problems while traveling abroad:

 

1. Make a copy of your passport and leave your passport somewhere safe

WHY? Losing your passport or having it stolen will complicate your time abroad in a very unfun and highly stressful way. Keep your passport stored somewhere secure and carry around a copy with you wherever you go.

 

2. Hold onto your fare ticket

WHY? Because so many people dodge fares on trains and buses, you may get stopped by authorities looking for proof that you paid for your ride. If you throw away your ticket stub unintentionally, you may end up having to pay a hefty fee.

 

problems while traveling

 

3. Keep your phone charged as much as possible

WHY? You never know when you might need to make an emergency call or connect to wifi to do a little investigation. Your phone is your communication tool if you’re unsure of where you are or where you need to be, or if you’re in trouble. It’s also where a lot of important travel information is stored, like addresses, phone numbers and maps.

 

4. Double-check flight guidelines, especially at discount airlines

WHY? Even though discount airlines offer unbeatable flight prices, oftentimes there are extra charges for baggage and other fees that may end up costing you more than you planned for. For instance, Ryanair requires you to check in online before your flight and print your ticket ahead of time or you have to pay a hefty fee at the airport.

 

5. Don’t carry all of your cash when you’re out

WHY? Just to be safe, don’t ever walk around with a large amount of cash on you. Especially if you look lost in a big city, you’re more likely to be targeted by pickpockets. For this very reason you also want to leave one of your credit or debit cards in a secure place where you’re staying. That way, in the unfortunate and unlikely occasion that you’re robbed, you still are able to access more money.

 

problems while traveling

 

6. Be savvy in touristy areas

WHY? Tourist areas tend to attract thieves because they are full of outsiders who are not familiar with the area, potentially distracted by the large amounts of people and tourist attractions and are probably carrying more cash than the average local. Be mindful of your belongings in these areas and keep an eye out for suspicious activities.

 

7. If you’re returning somewhere late at night, know how to get back

WHY? Always know how to get home – especially late at night. Being lost under the shade of night puts you at more risk. For example, if a taxi drivers can tell you’re not sure where you are, they may charge you a higher fare. If you know where you’re going and how to get there fast, you’re minimizing your risk of an unfortunate encounter.

 

8. Travel with shoes you know are sturdy and comfortable

WHY? The last thing you want to happen while you’re exploring a new city is to all of a sudden have a shoe break or get a painful blister. It will complicate your day, bring you pain and it’s easily avoidable.

 

 

Now that you know how to avoid these problems while traveling, learn more about how to boost your career with an internship abroad.

 

Sources: https://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Ryanair/checkin.php

Photos

1. based on Lost, by Leo Hidalgo, CC-by-2.0

2. based on iPhone, by Philip Brookes, CC-by-NC ND 2.0

3. based on Euros, by Images Money, CC-by-2.0

WELCOME

The International Internships Blog is a collaboration by The Intern Group staff, alumni and current participants to give you career advice & tips, program information, & so much more!

To learn how to apply to our internship programs, click here.

Categories

Elizabeth Trovall

After short stints in Argentina and Belize, Elizabeth is finishing up her fourth year in Santiago, Chile. Elizabeth writes about international internships, life abroad and professional development for The Intern Group. She also reports on politics, business and culture in Latin America for public radio and print media. An Austin, Texas native, Elizabeth first left home to earn her journalism degree from the Reynolds Institute of Journalism at the University of Missouri. Besides her friends and family, she misses live music and Mexican food the most.
Subscribe to our newsletter